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The arrival of the Red Kite, and getting in on the Emperor action

 Like buses, Red Kites. Hot on the heels of one on patch and 2 just off around Hales, I added a further 3 birds yesterday and I feel like this species has now formally announced its arrival having briefly popped in earlier in the year. 2 birds were spotted high above Wheatfen by my cousin Ben Moyes, and a further bird was seen close to home at Claxton marshes late in the afternoon of the 6th. A superb addition and surely here to stay.

Looking back over my notes since my last post, a singing Blackcap on the 25th of March was my earliest record for the patch. Others have since piled in and are vocal throughout the valley in gardens scrub and woodland. Debs and I finally connected with some Hirundines with 4 Sand Martin and 2 Swallow following the river west at Buckenham Marshes RSPB. Swallow soon followed this side of the river, when at least 2 were seen hawking for insects with a House Martin on the 6th at Surlingham Church Marsh. I had to wait until April the 3rd for the first Willow Warbler song, an absolute joy to hear as always, and since then another 2 birds have made the presence known at Church Marsh.The first Sedge Warbler was at Claxton Marshes on the 4th and at least 3 were at Church Marsh yesterday. Such an exciting time of year, I love adding the migrants to the patch year list and watch them settle in for another summer here.

It was a real privilege to observe a pair of Nuthatch in private woodland adjacent to Church Marsh. They have become a patch certainty with the Wheatfen bird/s, and with a lone male on patch at Church Marsh last winter I hoped for a further range expansion, but didn't expect it so soon. Having heard nothing from them this year, yesterday was a pleasant surprise. With a vocal male showing well (see below) a female soon joined him and the pair were observed mating. More great news for the patch and its seemingly growing diversity. I was pleased that team Moyes got to see them.

Having left Church Marsh and been to Rockland Broad, Colin Ben and I returned to Claxton Marshes to pick up Ben's Emperor Moth lure. I didn't hold out much hope for this, and the excellent Norfolk Moths website showed a paucity of records in my square and surrounds. It was therefore with great shock and excitement that as we approached the lure, a male Emperor Moth launched itself into the air. This fantastic looking beast refused to settle for a photo, but the 3 of us didn't mind, stunned though we were. Where on earth had this thing come from, and had we just got really lucky, or picked the location wisely? I will certainly be purchasing my own lure and will try again at this site soon. Stay tuned for more Emperor action!

With it being the Easter Holidays, the garden trap has been out these last few dry nights. Frosted Green, Purple Thorn and Muslin Moth the highlights so far. Need to sit down this weekend and get my sightings uploaded. Holly Blue, Red Admiral and Orange Tip have been other recent Lep additions. I am yet to see a Comma, and that will be a genuine fist pump moment as over the years they have jumped ahead of the pack as my favourite local Butterfly.

A quick walk down to the river today, more Raptor activity with Buzzards and Harrier distantly displaying. The cry of the wild- a Curlew made it onto the year list.

After the Nuthatch photos is the image of the possible Sinensis Cormorant from early March. I would appreciate any feedback on this individual.





Comments

  1. Re. the Cormorant. As far as I know the only reliable way to get them to sub-species is to measure the gular angle, so you need a decent photo of the head and bill. Some old books had a photo of carbo with a black head and sinensis with a white head, implying that white filoplumes = sinensis, which isn't accurate as both do in breeding plumage. Interestingly I have checked some at Whitlingham, and it turns out that far from being unsual, most of them are sinensis. Carbo seem scarcer and more coastal.

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  2. Fascinating, thanks James. I basically need to invest in a different camera then.......:)

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