Skip to main content

Getting back into the patch

It hasn't taken long to wash away any post-Spain blues, with Spring in full swing in the South Yare Valley there is much to see and enjoy. The sun shone on the 16th and the first Butterflies emerged from hibernation, a pair of Brimstone in Claxton along with Peacock and Small Tortoiseshell at neighbouring Langley. Always a red letter day when the first Butterfly of the year is sighted, and I look forward to a Summer in search of more.

Amongst the mist and murk that the 12th bought, I recorded the first returning Warblers at Church Marsh. Chiffchaff, Willow Warbler, Sedge Warbler and Blackcap were all welcome new for the year, and to be honest some have probably been around since earlier in the month. With Lesser Celandine and Grape Hyacinth in flower, it was beginning to feel like Spring, but the season was having to make every effort to please amidst misty cold conditions.

It was really this weekend gone that Spring could finally breathe, with temperatures today reaching almost 25 Degrees C. Although Saturday was a little cooler, upon opening the Moth trap 2 Cuckoo sang from the marshes to the north and south. Orange Tip and a likely Holly Blue were in the garden, the first of the emergence after the hibernators have made their play. A dusk visit to Claxton Marshes ended with a nice pint of Trawlorboys and a loud and agonisingly close Grasshopper Warbler. He was still there this morning, giving it hell and out of sight again. Whitethroat was another new for the year, the nettle-creeper also in full song whilst giving his new territory the once over. Tremendous views of Barn Owl at both Claxton and Langley marshes, hopefully both males doting on the incubating female someplace.

I had a couple of hours to spend with Rose this morning, so before the park we went to Rockland Broad. An Arctic Tern had been reported, but I settled for a pair of Common. A Reed Warbler pushed me closer to a full house of returning Warblers and of note were 2 singing Cettis, a species that has been wiped out on the coast after The Beast.

Mothing has not been prolific (around 25 species for the year) but I was thrilled with first a Pine Beauty this morning, and then almost embarrassed to pull out a Purple Thorn. Both new for the garden and me, properly spoiled today. EDIT- Purple Thorn a second for the garden, thanks to Moysie for reminding me!

Sighting of the Spring so far goes to Debs, who had 3 Crane south over Claxton on the 20th, and as if that wasn't enough to make me wince, a Peregrine hunting the field out the back too.


Purple Thorn 

 
 Sunset over Claxton looking towards Rockland

Rockland Broad- Common Terns

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Estonia Trip Report, April 2011

Estonia April 12th-19th 2011, Jim Bradley. ice_bear1@hotmail.com
Ice at the ferry crossing


Exploring the ancient forest



Red-breasted Goose at Audru



Pick the bones out of that!


Great-grey Shrike near Spithami.






Introduction.
Estonia is a place of real wilderness, yet easy to explore with the possibility of some cracking birds. Recent literature from both Gerard Gorman and Dave Gosney means that there is now plenty of useful information on birding Estonia, yet this country remains relatively unknown compared to other eastern European states such as Poland, Hungary and the Czech Republic. Steller’s Eider, Owls and Woodpeckers in early Spring, Citrine Wagtail, Great Snipe, Great Spotted Eagle, Black Stork and Greenish Warbler in May and beyond are just some of the birds you may encounter.

We used Estonian Nature Tours http://www.naturetours.ee/ to help plan and guide our trip. We are a young couple, so did not fancy being part of a tour bus scenario, and were keen to do most of the birding ou…

A local phenomenon

In the time it took me to drive down the long uneven track to the enigma that is The Beauchamp Arms, the satellite Corvid roost had grown from zero to around 300 birds. A roughly even mix of Rooks and Jackdaws assemble on Claxton Marshes every evening during the Winter (currently around 15.30) and 50 minutes later a mass of circa 5000 birds have left for the giant roost at Buckenham Carrs north of the river. This was the first time I had made a clear note of timings, and was surprised by how quickly the meeting point goes from raucous to silent. In fact, an eerie quiet falls upon the avenue of trees around 16.00, and a lone cock Pheasant outcried the 1000s of Corvids perched on trees or loafing on the marshy ground beneath. What follows are a number of reshufflings as the restless birds take flight in small waves, taking a new branch to perch upon. Around 16.15, a false dawn as a splinter group takes a more purposeful flight only to loop round and return to the main group. Only at tw…

Reflections.

A great summer of wildlife to reflect upon. Looking back at my diary notes, a number of items jump off the page and I will embellish upon a few here.

Early August I caught up with a tiny percentage of the Pied Flycatcher influx. I left the girls for half an hour on Caister beach on the 3rd of August (thankfully they were there when I returned) and stumbled across a single bird feeding on flying ants perhaps amongst the gorse. The following day I met up with Tim at Waxham, had a good yarn about all things education, and whilst most birds had cleared out I still picked up one bird calling loudly overhead.

The 10th was an odd day for me. I saw a new bird for the UK in Spotted Crake, but views were particuarly underwhelming and did make me question the whole twitching thing once again. On reflection, the day was more about spending quality time with my uncle and I will probably remember it more for that and getting soaked on route back to the car.

On the 18th of August, with the M40 as a …